Charlotte Perkins Gilman

«It is dull enough to confuse the eye in following, pronounced enough to constantly irritate and provoke study, and when you follow the lame uncertain curves for a little distance they suddenly commit suicide—plunge off at outrageous angles, destroy themselves in unheard of contradictions.»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman


«John laughs at me, of course, but one expects that in marriage.»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman


«Death? Why all this fuss about death? Use your imagination, try to visualize a world without death! Death is the essential condition to life, not an evil.»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman


«John dear!" said I in the gentlest voice, "the key is down by the front steps, under a plantain leaf!"»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman


«Will you excuse us all,” [Jeff] said, “if we admit that we find it hard to believe? There is no such-possibility-in the rest of the world.”»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman


«There is no female mind. The brain is not an organ of sex. As well speak of a female liver.»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman


«Its time we woke up,” pursued Gerald, still inwardly urged to unfamiliar speech. “Women are pretty much people, seems to me. I know they dress like fools - but who’s to blame for that? We invent all those idiotic hats of theirs, and design their crazy fashions, and what’s more, if a woman is courageous enough to wear common-sense clothes - and shoes - which of us wants to dance with her?»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman


«John says I musn't lose my strength, and has me take cod liver oil and lots of tonics and things, to say nothing of ale and wine and rare meat.»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman


«I am glad my case is not serious! But these nervous troubles are dreadfully depressing. John does not know how much I really suffer. He knows there is no reason to suffer, and that satisfies him.»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman


«[The Yellow Wallpaper] was not intended to drive people crazy, but to save people from being driven crazy, and it worked.»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman


«Woman" in the abstract is young, and, we assume, charming. As they get older they pass off the stage, somehow, into private ownership mostly, or out of it altogether.»

Charlotte Perkins Gilman