Science

«...nature is so immoral, vulgar, and downright wicked we can't possibly use nature's behaviors to set rules for ourselves.»

Dan Riskin


«I consider it an extremely dangerous doctrine, because the more likely we are to assume that the solution comes from the outside, the less likely we are to solve our problems ourselves.»

Carl Sagan


«A grain in the balance will determine which individual shall live and which shall die - which variety or species shall increase in number, and which shall decrease, or finally become extinct.»

Charles Darwin


«Psychologists call these fully absorbing experiences flow»

Ilona Boniwell


«The glassmakers had brought a new source of wealth to Venice, but they had also brought the less appealing habit of burning down the neighborhood.»

Steven Johnson


«Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.»

Arthur C. Clarke


«What’s the use of having developed a science well enough to make predictions if, in the end, all we’re willing to do is stand around and wait for them to come true?»

F. Sherwood Rowland


«For all knowledge and wonder (which is the seed of knowledge) is an impression of pleasure in itself.»

Francis Bacon


«I once read that if the folds in the cerebral cortex were smoothed out it would cover a card table. That seemed quite unbelievable but it did make me wonder just how big the cortex would be if you ironed it out. I thought it might just about cover a family-sized pizza: not bad, but no card-table. I was astonished to realize that nobody seems to know the answer. A quick search yielded the following estimates for the smoothed out dimensions of the cerebral cortex of the human brain.»

Jay Ingram


«Even if the open windows of science at first make us shiver after the cozy indoor warmth of traditional humanizing myths, in the end the fresh air brings vigor, and the great spaces have a splendor of their own.»

Bertrand Russell


«It may be appropriate to quote a statement of Poincare, who said (partly in jest no doubt) that there must be something mysterious about the normal law since mathematicians think it is a law of nature whereas physicists are convinced that it is a mathematical theorem.»

Mark Kac


«I'm an unabashed elitist. Everyone needs a good editor, and there is peril in worshiping amateurism and the unedited in science, art, and journalism.»

K. Lee Lerner


«I'm comfortable with the unknown -- that's the point of science. There are places out there, billions of places out there, that we know nothing about. And the fact that we know nothing about them excites me, and I want to go out and find out about them.»

Brian Cox


«The Book revealed to Muhammad is one and unique of its kind. It has left indelible impression on the hearts of humanity. Nothing can overcome its majesty. The Quran has given new dimensions to human thinking - Surprising reforms, stunning success! The power that created in Muslims a ravenous appetite for knowledge sprung from the Quran.»

B. Margoliouth


«How can we find spiritual meaning in a scientific worldview? Spirituality is a way of being in the world, a sense of one’s place in the cosmos, a relationship to that which extends beyond oneself. . . . Does scientific explanation of the world diminish its spiritual beauty? I think not. Science and spirituality are complementary, not conflicting; additive, not detractive. Anything that generates a sense of awe may be a source of spirituality. Science does this in spades. (158-159)»

Michael Shermer


«Although personally, I think cyberspace means the end of our species.»

Michael Crichton


«We think we know that chimpanzees are higher animals and earthworms are lower, we think we've always known what that means, and we think evolution makes it even clearer. But it doesn't. It is by no means clear that it means anything at all. Or if it means anything, it means so many different things to be misleading, even pernicious.»

Richard Dawkins


«The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them.»

Sir William Henry Bragg


«Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed. The imagination must be given not wings but weights.»

Henry Adams


«If a rat is a good model for your emotional life, you're in big trouble.»

Robert M. Sapolsky


«After the monkeys came down from the trees and learned to hurl sharp objects, they had had to move into caves for protection--not only from the big predatory cats but, as they began to lose their monkey fur, from the elements. Eventually, they started transposing their hunting fantasies onto cave walls in the form of pictures, first as an attempt at practical magic and later for the strange, unexpected pleasure they discovered in artistic creation.»

Tom Robbins


«If you don't synthesize knowledge, scientific journals become spare-parts catalogues for machines that are never built.»

Arthur R. Marshall


«â€¦numerical precision is the very soul of science, and its attainment affords the best, perhaps the only criterion of the truth of theories and the correctness of experiments.»

D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson


«Sometimes, in a daze, they completely dismantled the cadaver, then found themselves hard put to it to fit the pieces together again.»

Gustave Flaubert


«Life would be tragic if it weren't funny.»

Stephen Hawking


«Phd dissertations are for people who can't write books.»

Anonymous


«However life started, once established, it persisted for over 3.5 billion years and evolved from microbial slime to the sophistication of human civilization.»

David C. Catling


«When the time is ripe for certain things, these things appear in different places in the manner of violets coming to light in early spring.»

Farkas Bolyai


«Prediction in a complex world is a chancy business. Every decision that a survival machine takes is a gamble, and it is the business of genes to program brains in advance so that on average they take decisions that pay off. The currency used in the casino of evolution is survival, strictly gene survival, but for many purposes individual survival is a reasonable approximation.»

Richard Dawkins


«Am I right in suggesting that ordinary life is a mean between these extremes, that the noble man devotes his material wealth to lofty ends, the advancement of science, or art, or some such true ideal; and that the base man does the opposite by concentrating all his abilities on the amassing of wealth?'»

Aleister Crowley